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> IPv6 Web Hosting, any interest?
andy
Posted: Aug 13 2004, 09:16 AM
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Hello,

Some of you may have noticed that an entirely new internet is in the process of being built using IPv6 (we're currently using IPv4). The Asia-Pacific region, in particular, is rapidly deploying IPv6 to stave off exhaustion of their IPv4 address space. Europe is a close second and, ironically, the United States is dead last in adoption of the new protocol due to its long-standing IPv4 network being so firmly in place.

We have a chunk of IPv6 address space that has been assigned to our network, but I have not yet put in the time required to get it routed and accessible from outside networks.

Lately, several advances in IPv6 network infrastructure have made it possible for us to begin offering web hosting using IPv6. Some of those advances involve firewalling, bandwidth management, the DNS system, and the Apache web server itself.

Currently, no commercial hosting control panel or VPS software exists that automates the setup of IPv6 web sites (at least that I'm aware of), but we can set them up manually.

The questions at this point are:

1. Are there any pioneering individuals out there interested in putting up a web site on the fledgling '6bone' (the IPv6 Internet)?

2. Is there any interest in having an IPv6 address for your IPv4 web site so that it is available on both networks?

3. For those interested in having an IPv6 web site, are you willing to deal with some minor inconveniences (slower manual setup, for instance) associated with having a bleeding edge web site?

Any feedback I get on this will help us determine a launch timetable for IPv6 technology on our network.


--------------------
Sincerely,
Andrew Kinney
CTO, Advantagecom Networks

Please do not private message me. My regular management duties preclude responding to every customer that sends me a support issue. Instead, post on the forum or contact tech support.
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Fest3er
Posted: Jan 5 2005, 03:44 PM
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QUOTE (andy @ Aug 13 2004, 09:16 AM)
... The questions at this point are:

1. Are there any pioneering individuals out there interested in putting up a web site on the fledgling '6bone' (the IPv6 Internet)?

2. Is there any interest in having an IPv6 address for your IPv4 web site so that it is available on both networks?

3. For those interested in having an IPv6 web site, are you willing to deal with some minor inconveniences (slower manual setup, for instance) associated with having a bleeding edge web site?

...

1. Sure. It needs to be adopted, and ISPs need to get it going. I'll make my websites available on both 4 and 6.

2. Give it a go!

3. Sure. I do most everything manually anyway. I rarely use the control panel.

Besides, it's a good excuse to start using the 6-on-4 tunnel available on Linux.

N
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andy
Posted: Jan 6 2005, 09:27 AM
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Finally! Someone interested. wink2.gif There isn't quite a business case for it yet, but we're closer. Our router supports IPv6, we have an IPv6 allocation, and our primary upstream provider (PocketInet) supports IPv6 traffic.

A few hurdles remain. HSPC/virtuozzo doesn't support IPv6 yet. Our firewall will require a $1500 software upgrade to support IPv6. Our bandwidth manager device doesn't yet have IPv6 support available. As mentioned above, there is no control panel that currently supports IPv6.

We can work around each of those things, but each work around is quite time consuming. If we were to launch an IPv6 hosting service today, you could expect it to be rather expensive because of all the labor involved. By "expensive" I mean between $50 and $100 per month. We'd include lots of disk space and data transfer at that price, but the price floor is much higher when there is labor involved.

That is how it stands today. As certain things become available that aren't currently, our costs could drop dramatically.

As the various hurdles are removed, I'll post again on this thread with updates on our progress towards having a marketable service.


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Sincerely,
Andrew Kinney
CTO, Advantagecom Networks

Please do not private message me. My regular management duties preclude responding to every customer that sends me a support issue. Instead, post on the forum or contact tech support.
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Fest3er
Posted: Jun 5 2016, 05:13 PM
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Seems there hasn't been much domestic interest in IPv6. So I'll poke this thread.

I've been hacking Smoothwall Express, mostly to learn the mechanics of getting an address and a delegated prefix via DHCP, preparing to integrate IPv6 with the next version. It's extremely preliminary, but I do have a script (three, really) that brings up IPv6, gets a /128 for the internet interface, gets the default gateway, and gets a /60 (from Comcrash) for my own set of public addresses. I use three /64s from the /60 on the internal LANs, and one address of a another /64 on the internet interface. It also create a rudimentary--and static--IPv6 firewall that allow no forwards from internet, and allows only specific forwards out to internet.

The kernel in use (3.4) has no IPv6 NAT. So I'm using public address blocks; they make some firewall settings much more convenient.

I haven't done too much with it yet. I haven't set up DHCP internally. Nor have I figured out how I'm going to 'marry' the IPv4 admin interface to IPv6. I plan to leave the UI as IPv4 and have the 'back end' simply apply the IPv4 to the IPv6 prefixes and do everything automagically for the user. But what I do have works very nicely. Chromium and iceweasel both use IPv6 when it's available. And I could swear that IPv6's latencies are somewhat lower than IPv4's.

Now I need an external host I can interact with over IPv6; one can only do so much with google and facebook. Any chance I can get /128s assigned to my VPSen? Or at least the hwVPS? Have you made much progress over these past few years updating systems to be IPv6-capable?
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andy
Posted: Jun 12 2016, 05:56 PM
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At present, IPv6 is supported by the software and hardware in our network and all of the servers we've deployed in the last 5 years or so. We have an IPv6 network block assigned to us by ARIN.

That said, we have not configured it anywhere in our network. Most of the software supporting IPv6 has not matured and is still subject crash and data corruption issues. It's getting better, but it's not ready for "mission critical" use.

It's still on our radar. Maybe this year? We have some things queued up ahead of it that are rather important that we hope to complete in the next couple months.


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Sincerely,
Andrew Kinney
CTO, Advantagecom Networks

Please do not private message me. My regular management duties preclude responding to every customer that sends me a support issue. Instead, post on the forum or contact tech support.
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Fest3er
Posted: Feb 2 2017, 08:39 PM
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Ping. Any progress?

FWIW, Marples' dhcpcd has come a long way supporting IPv6; I can actually use it to get a /60.

I never understood why 'they' decided to make a /64 the smallest usable block on a LAN. I made some guesses and did some rough calculations a while back. If I wasn't having trouble with my math, I think somewhere around 2^93 addresses will never be used because of that /64 choice. If they'd chosen /96, that number would drop to around 2^61; still a large number, but more palatable.

Is the new facility working out well?
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andy
Posted: Mar 14 2017, 11:59 AM
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QUOTE (Fest3er @ Feb 2 2017, 08:39 PM)
Ping. Any progress?

FWIW, Marples' dhcpcd has come a long way supporting IPv6; I can actually use it to get a /60.

I never understood why 'they' decided to make a /64 the smallest usable block on a LAN. I made some guesses and did some rough calculations a while back. If I wasn't having trouble with my math, I think somewhere around 2^93 addresses will never be used because of that /64 choice. If they'd chosen /96, that number would drop to around 2^61; still a large number, but more palatable.

Is the new facility working out well?

My apologies for the late reply. This old forum software has a "feature" that marks unread posts as read if you login, logout, and login again. Since I don't always scan the entire forum for new posts when posting outages and maintenance, new posts are easy to miss. I only spotted this one because I did a quick visual scan of the most recent post dates for each section.

There has been some minor progress. Not as much as we'd like, but we do what we can with our limited staffing.

The new facility is not built yet, but we've also made some progress towards that as well. That has also been limited by our current staffing level.


--------------------
Sincerely,
Andrew Kinney
CTO, Advantagecom Networks

Please do not private message me. My regular management duties preclude responding to every customer that sends me a support issue. Instead, post on the forum or contact tech support.
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